Ye Olde Sensualiste
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Ang cute talaga ng cosplayer na ito, in fairview!

Ang cute talaga ng cosplayer na ito, in fairview!

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Still my favorite.

Still my favorite.

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A bit of Ballard at this year’s Manila International Book Fair. @nbsalert

A bit of Ballard at this year’s Manila International Book Fair. @nbsalert

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coochielatte:

jackanthonyfernandez:

carmelinaxox:

this is how gay people communicate 

Screaming

OH MY GOD

(Source: drinkdatkoolaid)

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When people say ‘This is my baby,’ they don’t always mean a baby. Sometimes they mean a dog.
A Somali student, on what has surprised her most about the United States. (via africandogontheprairie)
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spacetwinks:

one of my favorite simpsons gags of all time is still when lisa and grampa are at the table saying “i hate being old, no one listens to ya” “i hate being a kid, no one listens to ya” and homer walks in going “i’m a white male, age 18-49. everyone listens to me, no matter how dumb my suggestions are!” and fucking pulls out a can labeled “NUTS AND GUM - TOGETHER AT LAST!”

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meanplastic:

MY FUCKING FAVORITE VINE

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arkhamboundz:

lastseasonsloser:

misha-let-me-touch-your-assbutt:

mishasminions:

IT’S BECAUSE THEY’RE FRED & DAPHNE

FUCK YOU AND YOUR BITTER JEALOUS LONELINESS HOWARD STERN

YES SO GOOD!!!!!

That smug grin on his face. I love it. Pay up, Stern. 

(Source: s-gellar)

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sixpenceee:

Displayed in the Saint-Étienne church in France is the figure of René de Chalon, Prince of Orange. The prince died at the young age of 25 during the siege of Saint-Dizier in 1544. 
Rather then memorialize him in the standard hero form, his wife requested (or René himself requested, or possibly both) that he be shown as “not a standard figure but a life-size skeleton with strips of dried skin flapping over a hollow carcass, whose right hand clutches at the empty rib cage while the left hand holds high his heart in a grand gesture.” (Source)

sixpenceee:

Displayed in the Saint-Étienne church in France is the figure of René de Chalon, Prince of Orange. The prince died at the young age of 25 during the siege of Saint-Dizier in 1544.

Rather then memorialize him in the standard hero form, his wife requested (or René himself requested, or possibly both) that he be shown as “not a standard figure but a life-size skeleton with strips of dried skin flapping over a hollow carcass, whose right hand clutches at the empty rib cage while the left hand holds high his heart in a grand gesture.” (Source)

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Eyes Up, Writers

maggie-stiefvater:

maggie-stiefvater:

On Twitter today — and everyday — there was some chatter and scuffle about Some Authors’ Careers and Some Authors’ Fame and whether they had deserved it. Some folks invariably said the chatter and scuffle was jealousy. Some others invariably said not everything is jealousy.

Here’s what I think: having a writing career is like driving a race car.

I’m not really a grand race car driver, mostly because I’ve discovered that I don’t really care about winning against anyone but myself, which turns out to be not the point of organized sports. But I have been in race cars, and on race tracks, and have spent many hours doing classwork at over 70 mph. Enough to know that a writing career is a lot like driving a race car. 

One of the things they teach you in every single form of car racing is to keep your eyes up. Up. Upper than that. Upper than even that. Don’t look at the dash, because then you won’t see what’s happening on the road. Don’t look at the road right in front of you, because you won’t see that the turn you’re going into links into another turn and you could set yourself up for both. Put your eyes up as far as you can see down the road, and look there. Only when you see the absolute farthest point can you start to calculate the best way of getting there.

(this is great advice to use when you’re driving normally, by the way)

A writing career is like that. Use your peripheral vision to look at the things that are coming at you day to day, but never forget that every decision should contribute that farthest-away-point you want to get to. Never forget that every tiny success and failure is just a steer or counter steer toward the real point of the thing.

And here’s the other thing they tell you about keeping your eyes up: don’t fixate on the person in front of you. If there’s another driver just in front of you, the tendency is to stare at their bumper and then take the turn just like they do. But guess what? Then the absolute best scenario is that you will take the turn just like they do. So if they’re taking it wrong, you’ll take it wrong too. If there’s a better way, a faster way, a cooler way, a way that involves painting a giant knife on the side of your car and listening to Finnish rap very loudly, you’ll never know.

Eyes up, drivers, they say: look past the car in front of you. All you need to do is to note them well enough that you can pass them when you find a better way to take the turn.

Don’t fixate, writers. Eyes up, writers. I don’t care if x or y is doing a or b. What does that have to do with me? I have my eyes on where I want to go, and no one else matters.

The race is Maggie vs. Maggie. Who are you competing with?

reblogging this because the writer-envy piece in yesterday’s Salon hurts my soul on a most basic level.